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The Base Station

Why does anyone write anything when it’s already all been written and is so readily available on the internet? It provides me with no incentive to write something original when it has already been said so much better than I ever could. But I learn best by writing and that is my goal so I guess I will try.

To not quite quote an article I was reading, a base station is a receiver, placed at a fixed location, that monitors the GPS satellites . The base station corrects errors in the system and relays them to the tractor (rover receiver) through a radio link, the internet connected to a cell phone, then to the tractor through blue tooth.

But back to the base station. It is an antenna connected to a computer, or Raspberry Pi, that collects the satellite data. It provides a fixed location to correct the lack of uniformity in the satellite signal that the tractor receives, due to atmospheric conditions. Without it you get the low accuracy of four inches or greater. I know, I’m repeating myself.  The base is an NTRIP server. NTRIP means network transport of RTCM data over IP, what that means I don’t know. But the NTRIP server sends its info back to the NTRIP caster. Which is actually a server.

Confused yet?

A server, when not involved in all this stuff is a computer that hosts things like blogs and web pages and probably a lot of other things I am not looking that up too. But for this purpose the base is called the server and it sends its info back to a real server which for this job is called an NTRIP castor. Because it casts the info out to the tractor. Or not, but still called a caster.

One caster can have many different base stations hooked up to it. Each base station can cover approximately twenty miles, one millimeter per kilometer from the base, whatever the equivalent of that would be in miles.

So the base station (NTRIP server) connects to the server (NTRIP caster) which connects to the phone in the tractor (NTRIP client) to tell it how to steer the tractor.  Easy cheesy!

Until next time another great video by lance!

 

Trying to get my Head Wrapped Around This

As I mentioned before, on his birthday I believe, my ever brilliant husbands latest interest is farming with GPS. Or more accurately figuring out how to provide the GPS to farm with (or precision farming or site specific management or whatever). He is well down the path to getting it figured out and I am trying to follow him. So let me get it on paper, as such, so I can see how it works more easily.

It is kind of a chicken or the egg thing as to which comes first, the tractor or the base station, so I will start with the GPS satellites. They are in space streaming data down to tell us how to get places or tell us where we are. They talk to us. We don’t talk to them. That is important.

In order to use GPS for farming we need to know exactly where the tractor is. Down to the inch. So we have a base station, not in the tractor, and an antenna in the tractor. The position of the tractor is found by both tractor and base station receiving signals from the satellites. There are lots of satellites. American and Russian. They don’t rotate at the same speed as the earth so at times throughout the day many of them wont be visible which is why it is necessary to use the Russian satellites too.

The base uses the measurement of the distance, time, between it and the satellites and the tractor and the satellites to tell the location of the tractor. This is RTK, real time kinematic. (I feel kind of cool for knowing what that stands for like how I’m a real horse person because I know that a Coggins test is not for some disease called coggin but for Equine Infectious Anemia)

But we don’t talk to the satellites so how does the base station know where the tractor is to tell it where to go?

That’s where it gets complicated, cause it hasn’t been so far, so I’ll keep trying to figure it out. Until then here is a video that talks about it better than I can by the go to guy for this stuff.

 

Might be easier to watch here.

Our First Time

It’s not really a big deal. It happens all the time. But this was our first time and it was exciting! We enjoyed watching her up there and she loves to be the center of attention.

Walmart

We spend lots of time shopping there, not because we want to necessarily, but they are almost the only store in town and fairly cheap. Certainly not because we like them. Although people watching can be “interesting” there to say the least. But I don’t usually have a problem with them other than the typical driving out small local business complaint.

I received a text from my mother the other day that changed that.

Picture0212161536_1It’s pretty blurry, I didn’t see what it was about at first. But then she pointed it out, there on the second shelf down on the left in green. It is The Bible under romance and fiction. This isn’t at our local store, around here, I think, people would still have a fit at such a thing. I realize it isn’t a company run by anyone with any particular religious affiliations. Although old Sam Walton was active in the Bentonville Church of Christ it seems he was nudged to any charitable or religious action by his wife, and that they only gave a very small amount to charities when he was around.

But they do sell a good number of faith based books. Enough to compete with christian book stores. And here they are with the Bible filed as fiction. The romance part I don’t have a problem with, it is the greatest love story ever told. While there is plenty of good biblical fiction available that is a completely different matter.

What would the reaction be if any other religion was treated like this? Can you imagine the uproar and cries of discrimination? While I really don’t expect any better of Walmart I do hope this was of a single employee thinking they were making a grand statement, not company policy. I think we will try to keep even more of our business at our little local store.

Oh My, Aren’t You Getting Old!

From all of us!

From all of us!

It amazes me that at forty one you have children turning four and one. Wow deep.

I am thoroughly enjoying watching you follow your latest interest, watching the twists and turns your brilliant mind makes as you figure out a complex subject. Hope you enjoy it and go on to supply the area with GPS for their tractors. Hopefully you have bought yourself a little (big) birthday present by now?

You are a great father and, rather than be jealous, I am thrilled when the children run to you wanting their Lala. I love the way they take after you, 8 in his fascination for tractors and four wheelers and almost anything with moving parts and The Goblin Child in her skill with her computer and desire to watch you and emulate all that you do.

Spring is nearly here, soon, as soon as you can find time, you, with lots of “help” I’m sure, will be starting the seeds for your garden. More cold will come but for now we have warm weather and before too long the calves will be gone! Life is good, and we are lucky to share it with you.

Love you and Happy Birthday!

And maybe, we should get a couple of pictures of us once in a while?

Visiting the Ponies

We went for a walk today to jump in the muddy puddles and because it was too nice for children not to be outdoors. We stopped to see tho ponies while we were out. And crawled into the bale feeder, because what else would we do?

I loved the way the horses paired off with their respective people for the most part. The Goblin Child with Princess Onna and 8 with Coyote. Yes I am well aware that Coyote is mine, I love the rotten old man dearly and hope he lives to forty. But I am also thinking that maybe, if things go according to plan, which they never do, that he can be 8’s pony. Yes he’s hot, head strong, and on and on but he’s also trust worthy and dependable and the best pony in the world. Who says kids horses have to be quiet?

And did I pair off with Rusty? I don’t know. I like the little guy. Enough to keep? I still haven’t decided.

A Walk in the Snowy Woods

We had a few moments today with the sun shining brightly on the snow. We wondered through the yard and out into the tree row. The snow was deep and hiding under it were great treasures to be found. Then back through the corrals where I got to be a cow hearded into the chute. Finally to the yard for snow angels and swinging. It was a very busy morning and ever so much fun.

And Then He Walked

He’s been walking holding into our fingers for months now. We could send him back and forth between us but he would never go on his own. Then he started walking by himself last night. Just like that and he’s running laps around the house.

The Great Escape

I was hanging out laundry. My husband drove by on a four wheeler and asked if I wanted to ride with him and maybe check on the horses. I thought that sounded like great fun. We passed the horses, they looked good, and went out to see what was going on with his dad and the neighbor Clint who were having fun cleaning the corrals. We got out there and of course there was stuff that needed done.

The calves in the pen they were going to clean next needed moved across the lane and out of the way.  It wouldn’t take long. After  four or five trips around the pen and Clint getting out of the skid steer to help we got them! Yay!

We ran back to the house and got 8 in his backpack to bring along and went back to it.

We put the calves back then noticed that the previous bunch we moved were standing on a snow bank higher than the fence. Oops. Some crossed right over and went exploring.

We hopped on the four wheelers and ran clear through the yard into the wheat field and to the back of the pen to try to get them back over the fence. The four wheelers got stuck in deep wet snow not even half way across the field. We got out and went back through the yard into the pen, climbed over the same way the calves had and tried it on foot. As usual they could find their way out but not back in. One dropped her head pushed through the electric fence wire and lead the bunch off into the distance.

There are no real gates out of that field, nothing convenient for sure. The snow was too deep for four wheelers.  It occurred to me that I had a horse, but one horse and a bunch of yearlings, it was unlikely to ever work. But Clint was here! He’s a roper but that doesn’t let that stop him.  😉

8 got dropped off at home. He doesn’t get to come along in his backpack for this.

I asked if Clint was ok riding the kids pony and he thought his pride could handle the blow. I laughed a little inside about the thought of Onna being a quiet kids pony and we hopped on.

They weren’t off at the usual blistering pace but the snow was at least knee deep on them. We made shallower walking and sped up a little, in no time we were around the cattle and they headed back right where we wanted them easy as pie. We walked them right up to the corner where the fence was down into the drive way where we would walk them through the yard and into the corals. They stopped and one at a time, with each going in different directions, went back the other way.

Once it became apparent that our attempts to turn them were futile we let them go back to the corner they got out at in the first place. Of course they still couldn’t find their way in. But! Clint remembered another gate we could open. He ran and got it while I sat with the cattle. Then I gave him Coyotes reins and plunged into the high snow banks in the tree row and pushed the cattle down the fenceline. Other than wading through deep snow, low branches and cockle burrs it went nicely. They followed the fence right down, broke another wire and went in the gate.

Then the leader of the bunch, instead of following the rest out the other gate, ran and leaped the fence like a deer. Knees tucked up high she cleared it by a few inches, a tall guardrail fence. And she was gone. We may have cried a little. Back out the gate we went on ponies that didn’t have the sense to be tired. So Princess Onna hadgotten her first taste of real cow work. She was doing great so far.

We caught up with our calf on the far side of the field. She ran and ducked back into the tree row, I opened yet another gate, into the cow pasture this time and Clint followed her down the trees. This time I lead horses and he got off to walk the fence. She was no where in sight though. He came out to remount and about that time she stuck her head out by the gate. Unfortunately for her we were there and did see her. Fortunately for us she went in the gate. She ran right to the gate we needed to put her in and there were calves on the other side, we couldn’t open it and let her in. We tried to get the calves moved but by then I had lost her. Now she was somewhat contained at least.

We headed down the slippery lane to confer with the two who were still cleaning corrals. I went and brought the rest of the escapees and when I got back Clint was in with the cow heard sorting through looking for her. Alas she was not to be easily found. Our journey is not yet done, she is still out there, hopefully, and taunting us with her presence. She will be found.

 

A New Horse

For a little while at least.

His name is Rusty, Rusty Radiance if you want to get all fancy and formal. He is a rescue picked up by Forever Morgans from the Enumclaw  sale barn kill pen. I had been desperately craving a horse to train, I don’t miss starting colts that was just hard work. But one horse to get going in as long a time as needed, that’s my kind of fun.  My mom, on whom I can blame almost anything horse related, found him and told me about his plight.

He was going to be shipped to slaughter the next day, Forever Morgans needed a foster home for him before they could bail him out. I did not need another horse, cravings for training or not. So after thinking about it for awhile I asked my husband if I could take him and he didn’t see a problem. I figure I get around the not needing another horse thing by not owning him, he’s just here to visit for awhile.

Of course I’m blogging about him, that’s half the fun, just not here. I added a link to his blog in the links ( Rescuing Rusty) or you can find it here.

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